Planting purple Japanese sweet potato slips

I bought 30 purple Japanese sweet potato slips  from Karl Burgart,  Healthy Harvest Gardens,  at the Ellisville Farmers Market on Thursday, planning on getting them in the ground Friday morning.  After looking at my plot at WildWest Community Garden I realized that I  only have room for maybe one plant.  I planted one after adding some of Dana’s coffee grounds and some soil   left from “build” day.  Most references say that soil for sweet potatoes needs some extra preparation and that they like acidic soil.  Since I didn’t take any of those extra steps, I’ll be lucky to get many sweet potatoes, but I figure you have to start somewhere.  I left most of the potato slips there, hoping some of the other gardeners will try them too.  Karl said that they are supposed to be great “keepers”, which means they can store well after harvest.  Last year I learned another interesting fact about sweet potatoes: they need to be “cured” to improve their flavor.

I took the opportunity to record the progress of the squash and cucumber plants that I planted from sprouted seeds 6/4/11.  I thought I might be able to plant 2 or 3 slips at the church garden and drove there in spite of what appeared to be a developing thunder storm in the northwest.  After arriving, I unloaded my tools and the potato slips and surveyed the two plots there.  I noticed wild sweet potatoes, or perhaps they are just morning glories, along the path.

close up, sweet potato or morning glory?

close up, sweet potato or morning glory?

It’s fascinating to me that some plants are related – who would have thought that the sweet potato was in the same family as the common morning glory?  And until I planted radishes this year, I would never have thought about a radish making flowers.

Delicate pink flower on one nonproductive radish

Delicate pink flower on one nonproductive radish

Obviously the seeds come from somewhere; you would think I would have connected the dots.  And did the few that flowered in my garden do so because they were too crowded and the plant somehow decided that it should go to seed if the root wasn’t going to grow?  Or did it flower just because it had been in the ground a certain number of days?  Another mystery of gardening – if you know the answer, please share it with me.

I managed to get one slip planted in the south bed before I decided that I really shouldn’t be out in a field with thunder rumbling in the distance and foreboding skies closing in.  I hurriedly packed up and will just have to make it another day.  Leaving was a wise decision; the storm passed through the area about 30 minutes later.  We had more storms early this morning and are apparently in another cycle of unstable weather.

6-17-11 NW skies that prompted me to pack up and come home

6-17-11 NW skies that prompted me to pack up and come home

Gallery of Images, 6-17-11 WildWest Community Garden  & LW Church Garden (click on images to enlarge)

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