WildWest Community Garden looking fabulous!

Plot 36, Love the colors of the lizard and the marigolds!

Plot 36, Love the colors of the lizard and the marigolds!

Over the weekend, I planted some squash and cucumber seeds at the garden.  While I was there, I decided to shoot more images of various plots, just to show the fabulous progress, the variety of plant varieties and styles of gardening.  I only had my small camera with me and wasn’t really satisfied with some of the images when I returned home and began to edit them.  So, after showering, I decided to go back by the garden  before heading to the grocery store and re-shoot a few of the images.   I have a habit of putting my wedding ring and other ring in my pants pockets while around the house, and slipping them on as I leave the house.  However, this time, since my hands were dry and I planned to put on lotion, I left them in my pocket when I left the house.    I arrived at the garden and re-shot a few images.  When I got back in the car, I went to put on my rings and realized that I didn’t have my wedding band.  I spent about 15 minutes attempting to re-trace my steps, which was a challenge since I had roamed the garden, in particular trying to re-shoot a strawberry.  I searched the grass in multiple locations where I remembered kneeling and gave up the hunt, thinking perhaps I didn’t really have it in my pocket but had dropped it at home.  I went on to the grocery store, and then searched at home, to no avail.  My husband, son and I went back to the garden and searched for about 30 minutes before dinner with no luck.  I remembered a friend who owns 2 metal detectors and made arrangements to borrow them on Sunday.  Sunday afternoon I picked up both detectors and spent about 1 1/2 hours searching by myself, again with no luck.  I returned home, hot and sweaty, and ready for lunch around 2 pm.  My son agreed to go back to the garden with me when it had cooled off some.  We did an experiment with my other ring, safely tied to a long piece of red yarn and hidden in the grass, to figure out how the detector might sound when it passed over the ring.  Frankly, it wasn’t too encouraging as we couldn’t really get consistent results.   However, we went back to the gardens around 5:15 pm.  Imagine my excitement when around 5:45, my son came to me with a grin on his face and the ring in his hand!  He found it on the main path inside the east gate.  I was thrilled and we were happy to celebrate with dinner at one of his favorite restaurants, Wild Horse Grill.

Gallery of Images from Saturday and Sunday, June 4 & 5,

WildWest Community Garden

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That’s the good news and you can bet I won’t be walking around, kneeling down, with my rings in my pocket.  That was a close call.  Coincidentally, a couple of years ago my son lost his high school ring by leaving it on the bumper of his truck.  All he remembered was putting it there and later driving off.  We live on a steep and narrow private road, with lots of rocks, leaves and bushes on either side of the road.  He was sure it was gone forever.  I offered to walk our road and look for it, rationalizing that it would have likely fallen off before he made it to the main road.  Of course because it’s downhill, it could also have rolled a long way after falling.  I began my search, looking at all the leaves and vegetation along the road, thinking if it landed there, we would never find it.  I was about 2/3 of the way down the road when I spotted the ring about 2 feet from the road’s edge.  He was thrilled.  I told him Sunday, now we’re even.  Amazing that we found one another’s rings, lost in seemingly hopeless conditions.

I was searching online for information about climates in various states and how they are changing.  This is an interesting article on the many ways climate change affects biodiversity.  After 5 years in Missouri, all I can say is our weather is definitely nothing if not unpredictable.  I always thought Texas weather was wild and crazy, but it seems worse here.  It’s certainly had an impact on my nascent veggie gardening, in particular with my tomato plants.  I’m embarrassed by my sickly tomato plants, especially when compared to their neighbors.  I have plot 17 which is adjacent to Plot 3 (Arlene and Terry) and Plot 4 (Chrissie).  Everything in their gardens looks so healthy and the tomato plants are strong, covered with blossoms and/or fruits beginning to ripen.  It’s frustrating because one of the things I wanted to accomplish this year was to grow heirloom tomatoes from seed.  I ordered several varieties, most with a Ukranian heritage from Amishland Heirloom Seed.  I accept total responsibility for the poor health of my tomato plants as the seeds I purchased performed beautifully.  Following the recommendations of Lisa von Saunder, owner of Amishland, I soaked my seeds and started them, along with some I had saved from farmers market tomatoes purchased in 2007.  My husband built a warming box and a light stand with 2 fluorescent shop lights.  I planted the seeds in sterile organic potting soil once they sprouted and began the nurturing process.  I misted the seeds and kept them covered with a clear plastic lid to create a warm greenhouse effect in our 60 degree basement.  I was so excited when I had an almost 100% germination rate.

Kibits Ukranian tomato seedling, 3/13/11

Kibits Ukranian tomato seedling, 3/13/11

Each night I would turn out the lights and mist the seedlings.  As they grew, I transplanted from the small peat pots, to yogurt cups, then to plastic beverage cups, then to even larger containers.  I misted the foliage with Espoma’s Gro-Tone.   I frantically struggled to keep up with their growth.

5-5-11 Seedlings growing in basement - basil, tomatoes, broccoli

5-5-11 Seedlings growing in basement - basil, tomatoes, broccoli

Soon the table was covered with green, but the weather was not cooperating.  I gave away probably 15 Brandywine transplants in March or April.  I tried on several occasions to harden off the plants, but was continually hampered by cold and windy weather.  When I heard about the formation of the YMCA garden, I was excited to be able to participate.  I finally planted 7 tomato plants on May 6, before we had completed a trellis for them. I still hadn’t been able to harden them off, but we were leaving May 12, returning May 16 and I wanted to get them planted.   It was extremely windy that day and I thought I could stake them minimally and they would be OK until we installed the trellis on May 8.  However, by May 8, they were looking rather puny.  The weather was warm and windy, then it turned cold again while we were gone.  The night we returned, the temperature dropped to 37 degrees.   So I should probably say that my “initiation by fire/ice” experiment was  a failure.  I still have transplants at home, waiting for bigger pots or a spot at the garden.  I’m struggling with whether I should pull out some of the plants there and replace with some from home or give them awhile longer.

Even though I lost a lot of time looking for my ring, I’m glad I spent time looking around the garden.

6-5-11 Plot 30, Globe artichoke

6-5-11 Plot 30, Globe artichoke

I had never seen an artichoke plant (Plot  30) before or zucchini growing, (Plot 15).   I think my next trellis will be patterned after the one in Plot 39, Emily and Eric’s garden.  I may also convert part of my “Square Foot” garden to single, short rows as The Garden Society did in Plot 2.    After all, there are no rules in gardening, that’s part of the fun.

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