Fun “Lunch and Learn” at WildWest Community Garden

Saturday morning, 20+  gardeners gathered under the tent adjacent to the WildWest Community Garden to hear Eric Lober of Sunny Creek Farm, Villa Ridge, MO.

Eric Lober, Sunny Creek Farm, speaking with WildWest Community Gardeners

Eric Lober, Sunny Creek Farm

Unseasonably cool temperatures had several attendees wishing they had brought light jackets.  Eric talked about Sunny Creek Farm and how he and Kathy  began farming five years ago after completing a Farm Beginnings class (now known as Grow Your Farm) offered by University of Missouri.    They lease 174 acres, with about 2 1/2 acres planted in produce.  Their current focus is on raising animals – cows and chickens – for processing into meats.  They raise grass fed beef which is inspected by Swiss Meats and pasture raised chickens which are processed, inspected and immediately frozen as whole birds at a facility in Loose Creek, MO.  They sell meats and some produce to  St. Louis restaurants, attend the Wildwood Farmers Market on Saturdays, and provide  CSA(Community Supported Agriculture)  subscribers with shares of produce and meats during the season.  They also market pork raised by Todd Geisert, Washington, MO.  When asked what time they got out of bed Saturday morning, Eric replied, “5 am”, which drew laughter from the audience.

They have worked hard to re-balance the soil on their leased land.  It had been used for years to grow hay which depleted the soil’s nutrients.  Eric recommended Midwest Laboratories for thorough soil testing.  It costs about $35 per sample excluding shipping costs.  He talked about the importance of micro-nutrients in the soil and the fact that a simple NPK soil analysis doesn’t include enough information to accurately select amendments.  One of the minerals that they have found necessary to add to their soil is pelletized gypsum.

They will soon harvest potatoes.  They applied Bradfield Organic fertilizers to this year’s crop and are looking forward to seeing improvements in their production.  Several gardeners wanted to know when to harvest potatoes.  Eric said that it is variety dependent, but it is definitely some time after the plant flowers.  Yukon gold potatoes have a short season of about 60 -70 days, but they don’t keep well.   He usually marks 50 – 60 days out from the time he first sees growth after planting.  When that time arrives, he checks a plant to see how the potatoes are doing.  If they are ready, he cuts the tops off before harvesting to let the skin harden.  They have access to a mechanized potato harvester that is owned by Missouri Organic Association ( or Cooperative).  They order potato stock from Potato Gardens in Colorado.

Eric also mentioned that pests are worse in gardens with imbalanced soil.  Questions were asked about what caused eggplant leaves to look like they had been shot,  riddled with tiny holes.  The problem is likely flea beetles and Eric said that it is difficult to treat for them with organic methods.  He and Kathy have tried every organic product on the market and have given up trying to grow plants susceptible to flea beetle invasion. While he thought some of the home remedies for pests might be practical or effective in a small garden, they have found that these methods aren’t practical in a garden the size of theirs.  Regarding blossom drop, particularly with cucumbers, tomatoes and peppers, he recommended Zone liquid calcium foliar spray, available at Morgan County Feed.  He cautioned that when you use foliar spray, you should apply it either early in the morning or late in the evening or the leaves will likely burn in the sun.   He also pointed out that heat and excessive moisture can cause blossom drop.  Eric said that if you have aphids, you probably have too much nitrogen in the soil.

On the subject of extending the growing season, he recommended Eliot Coleman’s book, Four Season Harvest.  An earlier Coleman book,   The Winter Harvest,   is available at the St. Louis County Library.  Methods such as hoop houses and cold frames are discussed in detail in these books.  Black plastic on the soil will also raise soil temperatures.  A hoop house greatly extends the season and allows the gardener to control the water received and protects plants from temperature extremes and wind damage.  There are seeds that can be started in August to plant in September.  He suggested kale and carrots as examples.  They usually start lettuce about 3 weeks before planting.

Miscellaneous thoughts from Eric – he read somewhere that brown or purple green beans germinate in cooler soil vs. the warm soil temperature requirements of the white bean seed.  He and Kathy have grown corn but  it required too much land to meet it’s cross pollination needs, so they no longer plant it.  When asked about a lettuce that would better survive the heat of summer he recommended Summer Crisp Lettuce.  He suggested Route 66 Organics as a source of compost for those who would like to amend their soil.  Route 66 Organics is located in Pacific and the owner frequently comes to the Wildwood Farmers Market on Saturdays.

The event was covered by reporter Jo Beck of the Eureka-Wildwood, MO Patch. Be sure to check out her story on their web page.  Doug Smedley barbequed delicious hamburgers and hot dogs for the lunch that followed Eric’s talk.  Several garden members brought additional pot luck items – brownies, cookies, salads, watermelon and dips.  I’m pretty sure no one left hungry.  Deanna Eguires manned a snow cone machine, offering to make icy treats for any one interested.

Deanna making a snow cone for Bella

Deanna making a snow cone for Bella

Jodi Smedley introduced members of the garden committee who received rounds of applause from the audience for all their hard work in bringing the garden to reality.  We are all so grateful for the hours of planning and organization that occurred leading up to the build day, April 30.  Everyone seems excited and enthusiastic about the efforts that have transformed a field of grass into more than 40 gardens brimming with a variety of beautiful flowers and vegetables in just a couple of months.  What a great example of community working together for a common goal!  Yea, Wildwood YMCA!

 WildWest Community Garden “Lunch & Learn” 

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Planting purple Japanese sweet potato slips

I bought 30 purple Japanese sweet potato slips  from Karl Burgart,  Healthy Harvest Gardens,  at the Ellisville Farmers Market on Thursday, planning on getting them in the ground Friday morning.  After looking at my plot at WildWest Community Garden I realized that I  only have room for maybe one plant.  I planted one after adding some of Dana’s coffee grounds and some soil   left from “build” day.  Most references say that soil for sweet potatoes needs some extra preparation and that they like acidic soil.  Since I didn’t take any of those extra steps, I’ll be lucky to get many sweet potatoes, but I figure you have to start somewhere.  I left most of the potato slips there, hoping some of the other gardeners will try them too.  Karl said that they are supposed to be great “keepers”, which means they can store well after harvest.  Last year I learned another interesting fact about sweet potatoes: they need to be “cured” to improve their flavor.

I took the opportunity to record the progress of the squash and cucumber plants that I planted from sprouted seeds 6/4/11.  I thought I might be able to plant 2 or 3 slips at the church garden and drove there in spite of what appeared to be a developing thunder storm in the northwest.  After arriving, I unloaded my tools and the potato slips and surveyed the two plots there.  I noticed wild sweet potatoes, or perhaps they are just morning glories, along the path.

close up, sweet potato or morning glory?

close up, sweet potato or morning glory?

It’s fascinating to me that some plants are related – who would have thought that the sweet potato was in the same family as the common morning glory?  And until I planted radishes this year, I would never have thought about a radish making flowers.

Delicate pink flower on one nonproductive radish

Delicate pink flower on one nonproductive radish

Obviously the seeds come from somewhere; you would think I would have connected the dots.  And did the few that flowered in my garden do so because they were too crowded and the plant somehow decided that it should go to seed if the root wasn’t going to grow?  Or did it flower just because it had been in the ground a certain number of days?  Another mystery of gardening – if you know the answer, please share it with me.

I managed to get one slip planted in the south bed before I decided that I really shouldn’t be out in a field with thunder rumbling in the distance and foreboding skies closing in.  I hurriedly packed up and will just have to make it another day.  Leaving was a wise decision; the storm passed through the area about 30 minutes later.  We had more storms early this morning and are apparently in another cycle of unstable weather.

6-17-11 NW skies that prompted me to pack up and come home

6-17-11 NW skies that prompted me to pack up and come home

Gallery of Images, 6-17-11 WildWest Community Garden  & LW Church Garden (click on images to enlarge)

Presto it’s pesto!

Of course making pesto isn’t quite that fast, especially when it’s the first time in awhile.  After a conversation about pesto with my neighbor  at the community garden this morning, I was inspired to make a batch.  Well, actually two batches.  I had a colander full of a variety of basil with some of the largest leaves cut from a plant that I saved from a pot of basil microgreens.

 Harvested Basil, Freshly made Pesto, and Basil Flowers

I followed a basic recipe, Classic Basil Pesto from Pestos! by Dorothy Rankin.  The recipe ingredients include basil, garlic cloves, grated Parmesan and Romano, pine nuts or walnuts and lots of olive oil.  I removed the stems and used a salad spinner to dry the washed leaves.  I added the juice of a lemon and I wasn’t too precise with my measurements when adding the basil or the cheeses.  I used equal quantities of  ParmigianoReggiano  and Stella Romano.   Rankin suggests Romano Pecorino and calls for more Parmesan than Romano because the Romano is sharper.  I didn’t find that to be an issue; maybe because I used a different brand of Romano.   I also used walnuts instead of pine nuts.  When I’ve tried pine nuts in spite of their price I’ve found them to be rancid, so I don’t buy them.  I have been told you can get tasty pine nuts at Di Gregorios Italian Market on The Hill in St. Louis but I haven’t been down there in awhile.   In my view the olive oil is a critical ingredient so I used 1/2 cup of Olea Estates oil.  This fabulous oil is available from Karl Burgart, Healthy Harvest Gardens.  He is a regular at the Ellisville Farmers Market.  I’m hoping he’ll have his shipment of Greek olives at the market tomorrow.  I’d love to include some with the pesto, maybe a fresh vegetable or two from the market and some nice pasta.  Hopefully I’ll remember to capture the dish and post after dinner tomorrow night!

Transitioning from spring to summer crops

The Latest Harvest, 6/10/11

Reflecting upon the last 2 months since I started my first community garden at the church, I thought it might be a good time to take stock of my progress.  I have had several bunches of radishes and Swiss chard from the church gardens I started at the end of March.  While I had some beautiful broccoli transplants started from seed, I have only gotten a couple of very small stems and actually had to throw one away last night because it had turned yellow in the refrigerator.  I had a reasonable harvest of small onions.  By the time the spinach was ready  to harvest, it had gone to seed.  I can definitely say that there’s no way we could have survived on the small quantity of food that I have raised.  However, I’m not ready to throw in the towel just yet.  I have realized that perhaps the square foot approach isn’t the best for our needs; perhaps short rows would work better.  I also think the spacing between my plants is too close.  I’m still holding out hope that I’ll have a reasonable harvest of beans, potatoes and tomatoes.  We’ll see.  I am glad that I have the farmers markets to fall back on and that I’m not depending on the production of my vegetable beds to feed us.  I’m afraid we would be pretty hungry about now.  I did have a conversation with Pat at the Ellisville Farmers Market who mentioned that since she no longer has a half acre garden, she buys produce, usually at  Theis Farm, and cans it.  I guess I can do that as a last resort.   And there’s always the option of visiting a “u pick it” farm.  Sounds like a field trip in the making and subject for another post.

WildWest Community Garden looking fabulous!

Plot 36, Love the colors of the lizard and the marigolds!

Plot 36, Love the colors of the lizard and the marigolds!

Over the weekend, I planted some squash and cucumber seeds at the garden.  While I was there, I decided to shoot more images of various plots, just to show the fabulous progress, the variety of plant varieties and styles of gardening.  I only had my small camera with me and wasn’t really satisfied with some of the images when I returned home and began to edit them.  So, after showering, I decided to go back by the garden  before heading to the grocery store and re-shoot a few of the images.   I have a habit of putting my wedding ring and other ring in my pants pockets while around the house, and slipping them on as I leave the house.  However, this time, since my hands were dry and I planned to put on lotion, I left them in my pocket when I left the house.    I arrived at the garden and re-shot a few images.  When I got back in the car, I went to put on my rings and realized that I didn’t have my wedding band.  I spent about 15 minutes attempting to re-trace my steps, which was a challenge since I had roamed the garden, in particular trying to re-shoot a strawberry.  I searched the grass in multiple locations where I remembered kneeling and gave up the hunt, thinking perhaps I didn’t really have it in my pocket but had dropped it at home.  I went on to the grocery store, and then searched at home, to no avail.  My husband, son and I went back to the garden and searched for about 30 minutes before dinner with no luck.  I remembered a friend who owns 2 metal detectors and made arrangements to borrow them on Sunday.  Sunday afternoon I picked up both detectors and spent about 1 1/2 hours searching by myself, again with no luck.  I returned home, hot and sweaty, and ready for lunch around 2 pm.  My son agreed to go back to the garden with me when it had cooled off some.  We did an experiment with my other ring, safely tied to a long piece of red yarn and hidden in the grass, to figure out how the detector might sound when it passed over the ring.  Frankly, it wasn’t too encouraging as we couldn’t really get consistent results.   However, we went back to the gardens around 5:15 pm.  Imagine my excitement when around 5:45, my son came to me with a grin on his face and the ring in his hand!  He found it on the main path inside the east gate.  I was thrilled and we were happy to celebrate with dinner at one of his favorite restaurants, Wild Horse Grill.

Gallery of Images from Saturday and Sunday, June 4 & 5,

WildWest Community Garden

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That’s the good news and you can bet I won’t be walking around, kneeling down, with my rings in my pocket.  That was a close call.  Coincidentally, a couple of years ago my son lost his high school ring by leaving it on the bumper of his truck.  All he remembered was putting it there and later driving off.  We live on a steep and narrow private road, with lots of rocks, leaves and bushes on either side of the road.  He was sure it was gone forever.  I offered to walk our road and look for it, rationalizing that it would have likely fallen off before he made it to the main road.  Of course because it’s downhill, it could also have rolled a long way after falling.  I began my search, looking at all the leaves and vegetation along the road, thinking if it landed there, we would never find it.  I was about 2/3 of the way down the road when I spotted the ring about 2 feet from the road’s edge.  He was thrilled.  I told him Sunday, now we’re even.  Amazing that we found one another’s rings, lost in seemingly hopeless conditions.

I was searching online for information about climates in various states and how they are changing.  This is an interesting article on the many ways climate change affects biodiversity.  After 5 years in Missouri, all I can say is our weather is definitely nothing if not unpredictable.  I always thought Texas weather was wild and crazy, but it seems worse here.  It’s certainly had an impact on my nascent veggie gardening, in particular with my tomato plants.  I’m embarrassed by my sickly tomato plants, especially when compared to their neighbors.  I have plot 17 which is adjacent to Plot 3 (Arlene and Terry) and Plot 4 (Chrissie).  Everything in their gardens looks so healthy and the tomato plants are strong, covered with blossoms and/or fruits beginning to ripen.  It’s frustrating because one of the things I wanted to accomplish this year was to grow heirloom tomatoes from seed.  I ordered several varieties, most with a Ukranian heritage from Amishland Heirloom Seed.  I accept total responsibility for the poor health of my tomato plants as the seeds I purchased performed beautifully.  Following the recommendations of Lisa von Saunder, owner of Amishland, I soaked my seeds and started them, along with some I had saved from farmers market tomatoes purchased in 2007.  My husband built a warming box and a light stand with 2 fluorescent shop lights.  I planted the seeds in sterile organic potting soil once they sprouted and began the nurturing process.  I misted the seeds and kept them covered with a clear plastic lid to create a warm greenhouse effect in our 60 degree basement.  I was so excited when I had an almost 100% germination rate.

Kibits Ukranian tomato seedling, 3/13/11

Kibits Ukranian tomato seedling, 3/13/11

Each night I would turn out the lights and mist the seedlings.  As they grew, I transplanted from the small peat pots, to yogurt cups, then to plastic beverage cups, then to even larger containers.  I misted the foliage with Espoma’s Gro-Tone.   I frantically struggled to keep up with their growth.

5-5-11 Seedlings growing in basement - basil, tomatoes, broccoli

5-5-11 Seedlings growing in basement - basil, tomatoes, broccoli

Soon the table was covered with green, but the weather was not cooperating.  I gave away probably 15 Brandywine transplants in March or April.  I tried on several occasions to harden off the plants, but was continually hampered by cold and windy weather.  When I heard about the formation of the YMCA garden, I was excited to be able to participate.  I finally planted 7 tomato plants on May 6, before we had completed a trellis for them. I still hadn’t been able to harden them off, but we were leaving May 12, returning May 16 and I wanted to get them planted.   It was extremely windy that day and I thought I could stake them minimally and they would be OK until we installed the trellis on May 8.  However, by May 8, they were looking rather puny.  The weather was warm and windy, then it turned cold again while we were gone.  The night we returned, the temperature dropped to 37 degrees.   So I should probably say that my “initiation by fire/ice” experiment was  a failure.  I still have transplants at home, waiting for bigger pots or a spot at the garden.  I’m struggling with whether I should pull out some of the plants there and replace with some from home or give them awhile longer.

Even though I lost a lot of time looking for my ring, I’m glad I spent time looking around the garden.

6-5-11 Plot 30, Globe artichoke

6-5-11 Plot 30, Globe artichoke

I had never seen an artichoke plant (Plot  30) before or zucchini growing, (Plot 15).   I think my next trellis will be patterned after the one in Plot 39, Emily and Eric’s garden.  I may also convert part of my “Square Foot” garden to single, short rows as The Garden Society did in Plot 2.    After all, there are no rules in gardening, that’s part of the fun.

Hope springs eternal!

Hope springs eternal in the human breast;
Man never Is, but always To be blest:
The soul, uneasy and confin’d from home,
Rests and expatiates in a life to come.

-Alexander Pope,
An Essay on Man, Epistle I, 1733

And apparently “hope springs eternal” in the breasts of gardeners.

One of the plants I started back in February from seeds saved in 2007 actually has tiny tomatoes on it.  Never mind that the largest fruit is about the size of a small marble.  They are definitely tomatoes.

6-1-11 Tiny tomatoes

Blossoms on same tomato plant

I’m not sure if it’s called “wild” or “wine” but I do remember  that the tomatoes were small, juicy, with lots of seeds.  Of all the tomato plants I started this year, this one seems to be the most resilient.   Although I started  about 7 heirloom tomato varieties from seeds, I broke down yesterday and bought an heirloom tomato plant, the Mortgage Lifter.  I love the story behind it’s beginning.  I planted it today between two other heirloom tomato plants at the WildWest Community Garden, at the risk of overcrowding.  I’ve been frustrated by the deterioration in health of the heirloom tomato plants I have planted.  I know it’s due to several  reasons – weather keeping them indoors way past when they were ready to be transplanted; lack of hardening off, intermittent cold/hot/windy/rainy weather once they were transplanted.  Still it’s hard to watch a plant that seemed so healthy seem to be closer to death each time you go to the garden.   I’m now wishing I had supplemented the soil at the garden with a potting soil when I planted the tomatoes.

In addition to the arrival of hot and humid days, we are in the midst of an amazing miracle – the return of 13 year cicadas.  Growing up in Texas, we collected the exoskeletons of the annual variety of these creatures which we mistakenly called locusts.  Apparently many people think that locusts and cicadas are the same insect.    I have been researching the question of whether the shed exoskeleton would make good fertilizer – they seem to be every where right now.  I’ve found some really interesting facts.  Here’s a short time lapse video of a cicada emerging from its exoskeleton.  The process takes over an hour; the video is just a couple of minutes.  It’s amazing to see the cicada emerge and its wings lengthen.  I also learned that there are 15 broods in this species and that cicadas are unique to North America.  The brood appearing now in Missouri is a 13 year brood, know as Brood 19 (XIX) or The Great Southern  Brood.  This brood encompasses all the states enclosed by Georgia, North Carolina, Missouri, Tennessee and Maryland.  These insects somehow miraculously appear from their juvenile state to their adult state to breed, lay eggs and die.

Yesterday I planted another pepper plant, some beautiful nasturtiums, some tiny parsley transplants that I started from seed, Kentucky Wonder pole beans and 3 sad looking sugar snap pea plants, as well as a 6 pack of yellow onions that were so crowded that they may not survive the forced separation necessary to actually plant them.    I harvested a few more greens and a couple of onions and probably the only broccoli I’ll have before it bolts.

6-1-11 onions and greens

6-1-11 broccoli & greens

It’s difficult to be patient and maintain optimism while waiting for plants to grow and produce, so I’m thankful for the appearance of the tiny tomatoes on my plants.  While I’m waiting, I’ll enjoy the Early Girl tomatoes grown in hot houses by our local farmers and appreciate the fruits appearing on other gardener’s plants, like these from the WildWest Community Garden, that I photographed last week.

tomatoes at WW garden, plot #22

Whether you garden or not, farmer’s markets are a joy!

The Ellisville Farmer’s Market at Bluebird Park, opens Thursday evening, June 2.  It will be open 4-7 pm, rain or shine, through the summer.  Not sure when the season ends; probably late September-early October.  It’s always great to have another farmer’s market open . When it’s only 1.5 miles from your home, it’s almost like having a worry free garden in your back yard.  There are so many reasons to attend a nearby farmer’s market .  The atmosphere is always festive – there’s typically live music and some activity specifically for children.  Conversations with various vendors usually result in the discovery of a new recipe , knowledge of  a cultivar, or some other fun fact.  Two of my favorite vendors will be returning to this venue this year.     Karl Burgart of Healthy Harvest Gardens  sells produce, provides garden consultations and sells organic Greek olive oil and handmade olive oil soap.  Mike and Carol Brabo of Vesterbrook Farms sell eggs, turkeys, lamb and organic produce.   I’m looking forward to visiting with the vendors again this year and enjoying their organic produce.    Even though I have gardens of my own, I can’t possibly  grow the variety or quantity that I can find at the market.

Yesterday  Eric and I  finished mulching the areas around my raised beds at the church garden.  He made two trips to a landscape supplier, hauling cedar mulch in the bed of his truck.  Then he moved the mulch from the truck in the parking lot down to the garden in our wheelbarrow.   I had the easy job of laying the landscape fabric and spreading the mulch.

Church community beds after final mulching


5-24-11 harvest - chard, broccoli greens, kale, radishes and an onion

While I was there, I harvested some more greens and a few remaining radishes.

I also added more soil around the potato plants that I had planted a few weeks ago.

5-24-11 Swiss Chard – love the color!

Today was another day of severe weather – no gardening.  Just moving  plants on the deck  from open to covered space for protection in case of the predicted hail.  Fortunately, we didn’t experience any bad weather here – some lightning and rain, but no hail, no tornadoes, and no excessive winds.  Hallelujah!

Summer is on it’s way! Last night at 8:15 pm I saw my first lightning bugs!

I have always loved lightning  bugs, aka fire flies.  As a child in Texas, we entertained ourselves for hours on hot summer nights, chasing lightning bugs, putting them in mason jars and watching them blink.

  (Image courtesy of http://www.firefly.org)

Watching lightning bugs and blowing soap bubbles are two activities that bring out the child in me.   For many years, the appearance of lightning bugs was synonymous with the arrival of summer.  Over time, as an adult, I realized that they seemed to have disappeared from my summer evenings.  When we moved to a home on a half acre lot adjacent to 25 acres of vacant land in Dalworthington Gardens, TX, I was excited to rediscover these delightful beetles.  At some point, probably about 1990, we suffered with fleas from our cat going in and out and I had our yard sprayed.  Suddenly it seemed that the fireflies disappeared from our yard.  This experience  led me to re-examine my acceptance of common pesticides and herbicides.  Since then, I’ve reached the point where I don’t use any of these garden chemicals.

Since moving to Missouri in 2006, the appearance of fire flies each May has marked the beginning of summer, with dinner enjoyed on the deck many evenings.  I was excited to witness the reappearance of our lightning bugs, especially in light of the fact that we were under tornado watch 323, and knowing that Joplin, MO had just been hit by a tornado.  Waking this morning  to the developing story of rescue and recovery in Joplin, I appreciate these simple joys of life even more.     Looking at NDC historical data on tornadoes, there have been an average of 8 F2-F5 tornadoes each year in Missouri.  I seems like the state has already had that many to date this year.

Is it really May? Feels more like November.

Today it really does feel like November.  Wish I could share the rain with those still suffering from drought.  I finally moved the transplants from the covered deck to the open.  I had to do it in the rain, but they looked so pathetic I felt like I had to do something.   Hopefully the Algaflash feed and rain will help revive them.

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I don’t know what I’ll do if my North Face windbreaker ever gives out.  Although it was soaked; I stayed dry inside it.  Did you ever have a piece of clothing that held so many memories that you’d miss it if it were gone?  This jacket fits that description.  Robert gave it to me years ago – probably 5 or 10 years before our 21 year old son was born.  Here’s an image of our son Eric and me sitting on a rock at Estes Park, CO when he was about 18 months old.

1991 - with Eric at lake, Estes Park, CO

And there are many more memories of hikes and vacations, wearing this jacket.  Memories of Boy Scout camp outs, standing around the fire, knowing I could go home and wash the smoke and grit out of the jacket and it would be good as new.

Initiation by fire (or ice) – seedlings straight to the real world

May 11, the day before we left for the  wedding in Texas,  I transplanted tomato seedlings – again.  I replaced the broken Yellow Trifele plant with another one almost the same size.   All the tomato seedlings were getting gangly and desperate to be in the ground or at least in bigger pots.  I transplanted them and left them under the covered deck in hopes that the water in the pots would be enough to keep them until we return.  Like I said, initiation by fire.   It was 90 degrees on Wednesday May 11 and humid.  I changed clothes 3 times!  First to clean up enough to take the animals to the kennel after working with transplants for a couple of hours.   When I returned from the kennel, I still had native plants and herbs  to plant.  It’s a challenge when the herb sale is the last weekend of April, the native plant sale is the first weekend in May, and all the community gardening activity is finally in full swing.  After walking down the hill  through the tall grass to plant several plants, including the pipe vine next to the ladder,  I needed to take a quick shower before heading out for the last errands  and last watering at the two gardens.  I had a meeting at church at 6:30 so I had to come home and clean up, again, before leaving for the meeting.  We left the morning of May 12 for Texas, leaving my plants to fiend for themselves.

5-11-11 Transplanting tomato plant, again

Yellow trifele replacing the broken YT plant.
 
Friends said it was cold and rainy here in Missouri while we were in Texas.   May 16, the evening we returned, the overnight temperature was 37 degrees.  This prompted me to change my  post title to include ” ice”.  The weather has been so variable – 90 degrees, followed by cold, wind and rain, then repeat.   I was hoping to finally water and move the transplants from the shaded deck area  today but it is currently raining and 59 degrees.    Yesterday I made it by the WildWest Community garden and the church gardens.  The tomato plants at the WildWest garden definitely suffered from the cold and the winds.  I harvested more radishes, green onions, a few beet greens, a little spinach and about 11 oz of Swiss chard at the church community garden.

Radish harvest, 5-18-11 (6 red, 5 white)

Swiss chard, green onions, spinach and beet greens 5-18-11

The chard, broccoli, onions,  shallots and potatoes at the church garden are looking good.   The Waltham broccoli was planted April 7, the chard planted April 2, and the potatoes planted 4-17.

Broccoli

Chard

Potatoes

April 20, I planted 3 Yukon Gold seed potatoes in a tub on  our deck.   After covering initially, I have “hilled” them on 3 different occasions – the last May 11.  Basically I am covering with soil until the leaves are covered.

April 20

5-18-11 Potatoes after "hilling" 3 times

I am trying to do the same with the potato plants I have planted at the church community garden.

If it stops raining, I’ll try to move the transplants and hopefully document their status.

Reflecting on my vegetable gardening so far this year, I have concluded a few things:

1.  Swiss chard and radishes are easy to grow.  The challenge is convincing your family that they’re worth eating.

2.  The weather can drive you crazy if you let it.  Gardening is more fun in the shade.  Unfortunately vegetables really like the sun.

3.  Starting transplants from seeds is only a small part of the battle.  Actually getting them planted at the right time and keeping them alive long enough to reach production is a challenge I have yet to meet.